An in depth look into Turmeric Latte Mix

Our Turmeric Latte Mix... so what's in it???

Turmeric has been used traditionally in Ayurveda for centuries as a pain relieving, anti-inflammatory agent for pain and inflammation in the skin and muscles. The botanical name is Curcuma longa and it is a part of the ginger family. Curcumin, one of the active constituents of turmeric, exhibits anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and hypolipidemic properties. The curcumin content per batch of turmeric powder can vary greatly. In one study done of commercially available turmeric samples, the range of percentage of curcumin in the turmeric was from 0.58% to 3.14%. The turmeric we use in our mix is certified organic and has 5% curcumin. 

Science is finding a growing list of diseased conditions that show great potential for healing by the active ingredients of turmeric. One of the important pathogenesis in Alzheimer's disease is the chronic inflammation of nerve cells. Curcumin has a potent anti-inflammatory effect, which has shown positive outcomes in preventing AD as well as a form of treatment for those with AD. 

 

We use Ceylon cinnamon, or 'true cinnamon', in our Turmeric Latte Mix, as opposed to Cinnamon cassia which appears to have a high coumarin content. Coumarins are plant compounds that possess strong anticoagulant, carcinogenic and hepato-toxic properties, which could pose health risks if consumed regularly in higher quantities. Ceylon cinnamon has demonstrated numerous health benefits including anti-inflammatory properties, anti-microbial activity, reducing cardiovascular disease, boosting cognitive function and reducing risk of colon problems. 
Plus, it has the added benefit of being absolutely delicious!

Cardamom has traditionally been used for ailments such as constipation, colic, diarrhea and hypertension. Now, research has supported these uses and provides sound mechanistic background in overactive diseases of the gut. And having a healthy gut is super important! 
When gut health is out of tune, it can affect your immune system, digestive system, mood, weight, and more! 

There’s more to VANILLA than being absolutely delicious! ?? An active component of vanilla, called vanillin, has been shown to have a positive effect on the cardiovascular system, specifically with cholesterol levels. Plus, it is rich in antioxidants which are wonderful to incorporate into a healthy lifestyle to help prevent the breakdown of cells and tissues around the body.

When most people think of ginger, they think remedy for nausea… Which is true! But there’s also more! In traditional Chinese medicine, ginger is considered a pungent, dry, warming, yang herb used for elements triggered by cold, damp weather. In Ayurveda, it has been used to reduce cholesterol and fight arthritis. In one human study on the anti-inflammatory and pain relieving effects of ginger consumption, over 75% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and muscular discomfort reported relief from pain and swelling!

Just to spice things up a bit, let’s talk chili! I’m sure many people have heard about adding chili to foods to boost metabolism, which is due to its thermogenic nature (produces heat in the body). But the component in chili called capsaicin has pain relieving and anti-inflammatory effects. Chili is also good to remember when you’re feeling under the weather… capsaicin can aid in clearing up mucus and the beta carotene and vitamins A and C can help boost the immune system!

Black pepper in my latte?? Well, it seems like word is getting around that black pepper helps increase the bioavailability of the curcumin in Turmeric, in some cases to 2000%! So that’s how it made it into our mix, but beyond being Turmeric’s helpful companion, black pepper also has been shown to aid digestion, act as an expectorant to help in times of the cold or flu season, and provide even more anti-inflammatory compounds to this already super charged anti-inflammatory mix!

 

Like to try some ? -  https://www.chiasso.co.nz/products/Tea/turmeric-latte-mix

 

*NOTE: this article is purely for educational purposes and not to be used for diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Information above has been paraphrased from peer-reviewed research articles.